Sunday, October 15, 2017

Final Results for the Chess Femmes, Hales Corners Chess Challenge XXVI

[I updated the post at 8:31 AM on October 16th to reflect ALL of the female players in the Open Section (I had somehow managed to leave Megan Chen off the list yesterday, sorry Megan) and to update the percentage calculations for female participation.]

Hola everyone!

It seems the bad weather may have greatly depressed turn-out this year for HCCCXXVI overall, but we had a great turn-out of chess femmes yesterday and I'm thrilled to report their results here.  The Sun is back today (after much needed rain that pleased this gardener), hooray!

FIRST TIME EVER (if my failing memory serves me correctly) - A HALES CORNERS CHESS CHALLENGE HAS BEEN WON BY A CHESS FEMME!!!!!!!  Okay, so I'm over the Moon, LOL.  Anupama Rajendra (2105) won straight up with 4.0 outright, so she took home the HCCC first place prize money as well as an additional $200 of Goddesschess prize money for 4 Ws AND an extra $80 for the Goddesschess perfect score prize in the Open (awarded only to chess femmes).

My chess buddy and a great chess mentor in Sheboygan, WI, Ellen Wanek, who has played in the past several Spring and Fall HCC Challenges, sent me two photos of the chess femmes and there were 12.  Me bad, ladies, sorry - I only know who a few of you are with any certainty so I've left names off:

What a gorgeous group of chess femmes!

A total of 51 players registered (31 in the Open, 20 in the Reserve).  A ratio of 14 chess femmes to 51 total players yields a female player participation rate of 27.45%  Holy Cassia!  That's the best yet, ever ever EVER!

So, without further ado, here is how the chess femmes did (Goddesschess prizes):

OPEN 6/31 = 19.35% chess femme participation rate:

Anupama Rajendra (2105), 4.0.  $280 total - $200 ($50 x 4 Ws) plus $80 for perfect score prize.  She also will receive Goddesschess paid entry fee should she choose to play in HCCC XXVII in Spring, 2018.

Rachel Ulrich (2196), 3.0.  $100.

Susanna Ulrich (1851), 1.5.  $75.

Gauri Menon (1666), 2.0.  $100.

Madeline Weber (1569), 2.0.  $100.

Megan Chen (1673), 2.0.  $100.

RESERVE 8/20 = a whopping 40% chess femme participation rate:

Simran Bhatia (1554), 3.0.  $60.  Also will receive Goddesschess paid entry fee should she choose to play in HCCC XXVII in Spring, 2018. 

Aradh Kaur (1436), 3.0.  $60.

Sandra Hoffman (1428), 2.0.  $40.

Ellen Wanek (1273), 1.0.  $20.

Mansha Ghai (1220), 2.0.  $40.

Radhika Gupta (1100), 2.0.  $40.

Olivia Schaenzer (1164), 2.0. $40.

Runxin He (UNR), 1.0.  $10.

There are photographs from Round 3 at the Southwest Chess Club blog, many showing the chess femmes in action.  Full cross-tables at USCF.

The Don McLean Awards (for male players only in the October Challenges) were won by Anthony Parker (2225, 3.5) in the Open ($100) and Alexander Jentsch (1473, 3.5) in the Reserve ($50).

Saturday, October 14, 2017

Archaeologists Perhaps Closing in on Lost Satellite Pyramids of Queen Ankhnespepy II

From Newsweek

ANCIENT EGYPTIAN PYRAMIDION FOUND NEXT TO LARGEST OBELISK HINTS AT EXISTENCE OF QUEEN’S LOST CHAMBER

Mata Hari: A NASTY Woman

"Mata Hari" by Isaac Israels, 1915
Kroller-Muller Museum

Many American women (and the Mayor of San Juan, Puerto Rico) are proud to wear tee shirts proclaiming they are NASTY - the kind of woman that scares the pants off of men like Donald J. Trump and the GOP in general (Hillary Clinton; Nancy Pelosi; Michelle Obama).

After reading this review of an exhibit coming in the Netherlands, birthplace of Margaretha Zelle a/k/a Mata Hari, it seems to me that Zelle was reviled and feared by many men (and some women) not because she was a master spy but because she was a NASTY woman: sexually free, independent, capable of supporting herself in style without depending upon ANY male, assertive, intelligent.  She was perceived as a threat by many because she did not conform to the norms of the day.  Zelle was 41 when she was "executed" by a firing squad in France, after having been convicted of being a German spy.

Mata Hari in 1914.
Mata Hari, 1914.  Source: rarehistoricalphotos.com
Regal, beautiful, threatening to men.

From The New York Times
Nina Siegal, October 13, 2017

Femme Fatale, Fallen Woman, Spy: Looking for the Real Mata Hari

LEEUWARDEN, the Netherlands — In December 1915, Margaretha Zelle, the woman known to all the world as the exotic dancer Mata Hari, was traveling by ship from one of her lovers in Paris to another in The Hague. The international sex symbol was famous for provocative routines in a nude body stocking with a bejeweled bra and golden headdress. Sometimes she would tell people she was a Javanese princess or the daughter of an Indian temple dancer, but only rarely would she reveal that she was Dutch.

It was the middle of World War I and her circuitous route took her through British waters, where the authorities stopped the boat to question those on board.

After looking at Zelle’s papers, and searching her possessions, they made a note: No evidence of anything had been found on her person, but she was nevertheless a “bold sort of woman who is not above suspicion.” In the charged atmosphere of the war, this was enough for the authorities to call for her arrest if she ever tried to enter the United Kingdom again. A copy of their report was sent to the French secret service, where it landed on the desk of a French military intelligence officer, George Ladoux.

Ladoux, convinced that Zelle was a spy, became determined to catch her in an act of espionage. He recruited her to work for French intelligence, sure that she was a double agent for the Germans.

In early 1917, Ladoux later arrested and interrogated Zelle, and garnered what he took as a confession: She admitted to taking money from the Germans, though she firmly denied having ever provided them with any useful espionage. On Oct. 14, Mata Hari was executed by firing squad. Newspaper reports described her as refusing to wear a blindfold and blowing kisses to the soldiers who raised their rifles against her.


Friday, October 13, 2017

Update: Hales Corners Chess Challenge XXVI

Hola:

Where does the time fly, geez Louise!  The HCCC XXVI is TOMORROW, wow!

I don't have a players' list but I was informed a few minutes ago that there are currently 49 pre-registered players, 11 of whom are chess femmes, YAY!  As of right now, that means our female player partcipation rate is at 22%, which is FAB-U-LOUS, dahlings.  Four are playing in the Open and seven in the reserve.  Good luck, ladies!

The October Challenges are the one event a year where Goddesschess shares the love with male players, in the form of the Don McLean Award.  The highest scoring male in the Open Section wins $100, and in the Reserve $50.  (All Goddesschess prizes are in addition to prizes paid by the tournament organizers).  Don, who was one of the founders of Goddesschess and a primary force behind it from its founding in 1999, passed away five years ago.  He covered some events Goddesschess sponsored in Montreal and loved meeting and mixing with the players.  He was a slightly better chessplayer than I, which is to say - not even good enough to earn the "patzer" title :)  We had some rip-roaring games out on the back deck at my former Maison Newton during the summertime and in front of the fireplace during Christmas holidays.

You can find the flyer here.  Players can still register tomorrow between 8:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m.  Four rounds:  10:00 a.m., 1:00 p.m. 3:30 p.m., 6:00 p.m. 

I hope there will be a big turnout.  Good luck to all!

Thursday, September 28, 2017

Hales Corners Chess Challenge XXVI

Hola darlings!

It's hard to believe how quickly time has flown by.  Goddesschess started out with a small prize offering for HCCC VIII, and we've been a sponsor of prizes - particularly for female chess players in the Challenges - since then.

After the unexpected and too early passing of our webmaster and one of our founding co-partners, Don McClean, of Montreal, Quebec, in October 2012, in his memory Goddesschess began sponsoring the Don McClean Award for the top finishing male players in each Section, $100 for the Open and $50 for the Reserve.  We chess goddesses wish to share our love on occasion :)  The Don McLean awards are offered only in the October Challenge events.

The HCCC XXVI (Holy Hathor!) will be held on October 14, 2017 at the Olympia Resort in Oconomowoc, Wisconsin.  You can find all of the details on the online flyer along with an entry form.

FORMAT: Four Round Swiss System - Four Games in One Day - USCF Rated

TIME CONTROL: Game in 60 Minutes; 6 second delay

ENTRY FEE: $40 – Open; $30 – Reserve (both sections $10 more after October 12, 2017) Comp Entry Fee for USCF 2200+: Entry fee subtracted from any prizes won

SITE REGISTRATION: 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

ROUNDS: 10 am -- 1 pm -- 3:30 pm -- 6 pm Pairings by WinTD---No Computer Entries---No Smoking

PRIZES OPEN RESERVE:  1st—$325 1st—$100 2nd—$175 2nd—$75 A—$100 D—$50 B & Below—$75 E & Below—$40

GODDESSCHESS PRIZES IN ADDITION TO ABOVE PRIZES: 
Goddesschess prizes for females and males in addition to above prizes: For Females: Open: $50 per win/$25 per draw; Reserve: $20 per win/$10 per draw; Perfect Score Prizes for Females: $80 in Open/$40 in Reserve; Don McLean Award for Top Finishing Male in each Section: $100 in Open/$50 in Reserve

Early registered players for each Section will be listed (updated frequently) at the Southwest Chess Club blog. 

May Mother Nature smile upon us and give us a gorgeous day (and overnight next day if you are staying the night) for Tournament Day in southeastern Wisconsin.  And may Caissa be with you :)  I hope the highest number ever of chess femmes will turn out for this great event.

Monday, September 18, 2017

China Institute is Sponsoring a - FASHION - Contest! Yes, You Read That Correctly

Any Project Runway fans out there?  Well, this isn't Project Runway (which I love and have watched since its inception, now on Lifetime Television that I am able to stream from an internet provider), but for those qualified it offers a chance to get your designs shown in a legitimate fashion show and get a lot of exposure in the fashion center of the United States - New York, NY along with a cash prize of $10,000.00!



2018 Fashion Design Competition
October 6, 2017: Online registration deadline 
October 31, 2017: Design submission deadline
MISSION / PURPOSE
The China Institute Fashion Design Competition supports emerging designers and promotes creativity inspired by China's culture and aesthetics in contemporary, global design.  

ELIGIBILITY  
The Competition is open to: 
* students currently enrolled in a bachelor's or master's degree program in fashion design  
* 2016 and 2017 graduates of a bachelor's or master's degree program in fashion design  

All applicants, if selected as finalists, must provide their own lodging and transportation to New York City for the Fashion Competition. They must also produce, at their own expense, their capsule collection of three outfits for the runway show at this Fashion Competition held at China Institute, 40 Rector Street, New York NY 10006.  

AWARD
All finalists will have their work assessed by a prestigious panel of judges and will be promoted on the China Institute website and through social media. The competition will culminate in a fashion show at China Institute where the winner will be announced. The winning designer will receive a $10,000 award.  

COMPETITION CALENDAR
October 6, 2017: Online registration deadline
October 31, 2017: Design submission deadline 
November 1 - December 31, 2017: Panel of judges review applications 
January 15, 2018: China Institute notifies the top ten finalists by email and announced on the China Institute website.  
April 1, 2018: Deadline for delivery of finalists' capsule collections to China Institute 
April 16, 2018: Collections presented at China Institute Fashion Show and the winning designer is announced. 
May 2018: Winning designer invited to appear as a special guest at China Fashion Gala 2018 co-presented by China Institute and China Beauty Charity Fund. 

SUBMISSIONS 
All applicants must first register online. We encourage applicants to register as soon as possible. After registering, applicants must submit an application package, no later than October 31st 2017*, consisting of the following items: 

* 1 page for the 3 illustrations or plan of collection 
* 1 page for each illustration 
* 1 page for each flats/technical designs 
* 1 page for the fabric and material swatches  
* 1 page for the developed concept or atmosphere or mood board 
* 1 page for the written concept in English and how this is inspired by China (maximum 100 words) 
 1 resume/CV of applicant 
* 1 photocopy of current student ID or degree

Thursday, September 14, 2017

DNA Evidence Reveals Skeleton From 100 Year Old Viking Tomb Was Female Warrior

Unbelievable that we are just getting around now to cleaning up some 19th century GARBAGE conclusions about who was buried in important tombs and why.  We may catch up with it in, oh - say, 100 or so years.  By that time, the conclusions we've reached on some will STILL be proven to have been wrong, because women have always been a force to be reckoned with in the REAL world, whether you want to recognize that or not.  If you think I'm joking about not being recognized as such, please key in on some of the "experts'" comments made in the article! U N B E L I E V A B L E !

From The Washington Post:

Wonder Woman lived: Viking warrior skeleton identified as female, 128 years after its discovery

September 14, 2017, by Amy Ellis Nutt

An 1889 drawing of the Viking warrior grave discovered in Birka, Sweden. For more than 120 years, it was assumed to be the skeleton of a man. (Hjalmar Stolpe)
For more than a century after it was found, a skeleton ensconced in a Viking grave, surrounded by military weapons, was assumed to be that of a battle-hardened man. No more.

The warrior was, in fact, female. And not just any female, but a Viking warrior woman, a shieldmaiden, like the ancient Brienne of Tarth from “Game of Thrones."

The artifacts entombed with the 1,000-year-old bones and unearthed in 1889 in Birka, Sweden, included two shields, a sword, an ax, a spear, armor-piercing arrows and a battle knife — not to mention the remnants of two horses. Such weapons of war among grave goods, archaeologists long assumed, meant the Viking had been male.

Yet modern-day genetics testing on the DNA extracted from a tooth and an arm bone has confirmed otherwise. The skeleton, known as Bj 581, belonged to someone with two X chromosomes.

"We were blinded by the warrior equipment,” one of the researchers, Anders Gotherstrom, said in an email to The Washington Post this week. “The grave-goods shout 'warrior' at you, and nothing else.

A modern drawing of the same Viking grave, this time depicting the female warrior. (Neil Price)
Gotherstrom, along with nine other scientists from Stockholm and Uppsala universities, announced their results in a paper in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology. Theirs is the first genetic proof that at least some Viking women were warriors.


True Beauty is Timeless

Ahhhhhh, amore!  I've been thinking about that a lot, lately.  Perhaps I am getting overly sentimental in my old age?  Now piano concertos make me cry -- Mozart Piano Concerto No. 23, 2. Adagio; Chopin Spring Waltz (Mariage d'Amour); Rachmaninov no. 2 Opus Moderato Allegro; the waltz scene from the 2014 French version of "Beauty and the Beast," La Belle et le Bete.

Just dropping in for a short visit, things are super busy here this autumn and I haven't had time to do ANYTHING on the blog.  I was, though, this morning going through my Youtube "History" and came across this wonderful advertisement clip I saved for a perfume, featuring the ever-beautiful Sophia Loren.  It's fabulous, dahlings!


Wednesday, August 30, 2017

Ancient Babylonians Did Trigonometry

This is WAY cool!  From The New York Times:

Hints of Trigonometry on a 3,700-Year-Old Babylonian Tablet

By Kenneth Chang August 29, 2017

Suppose that a ramp leading to the top of a ziggurat wall is 56 cubits long, and the vertical height of the ziggurat is 45 cubits. What is the distance x from the outside base of the ramp to the point directly below the top? (Ziggurats were terraced pyramids built in the ancient Middle East; a cubit is a length of measure equal to about 18 inches or 44 centimeters.)

Could the Babylonians who lived in what is now Iraq more than 3,700 years ago solve a word problem like this?

Two Australian mathematicians assert that an ancient clay tablet was a tool for working out trigonometry problems, possibly adding to the many techniques that Babylonian mathematicians had mastered.

An ancient Babylonian tablet known as Plimpton 322 consists of a table of 60 numbers organized into 15 rows and four columns.CreditAndrew Kelly/University of New South Wales
“It’s a trigonometric table, which is 3,000 years ahead of its time,” said Daniel F. Mansfield of the University of New South Wales. Dr. Mansfield and his colleague Norman J. Wildberger reported their findings last week in the journal Historia Mathematica.

Rest of article.

Sadly, I could not make heads nor tails out of the word problem as I did not think I had enough information to solve what I understood the problem to be asking for.  However, what the article says is that it was a simple calculation of the length of the third side of a right triangle when we had the measurement for the other two sides.  Even I remember how to solve for any side of a right triangle if I have the two other numbers from high school trig, taken eons ago.  Really - that is what the word problem is asking me to solve for?  The way I read this problem, it was asking for the actual length of the ramp as measured on its outermost edge from its beginning (pick a corner, any corner, and go around each level upward from there) up to the point (how do you determine what "point?") just below the peak of the structure.  I did not read this to be a simple solve for "b" in "a squared" + "b squared" = "c squared."  LOL!  Silly me.  No wonder parents can't help their kids with this new math these days, geez!  Its indecipherable!  Who wrote that problem - is English their third or fourth language?
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